It’s morally wrong to file for Bankruptcy?

Many people facing bankruptcy feel a strong sense of failure and embarrassment. The banks and even the media would like you to feel it is your fault. The truth is my clients are good people who want to pay their debts but find themselves in a bad situation. Many have found themselves drowning in debt due to no fault of their own. You have a legal right to seek real debt relief under the U. S. Bankruptcy Code. My best advice is to hold off on any moral judgment until you have all the information.  If you would like more information on filing for bankruptcy click HERE to visit my website.

CAN I RE-PAY A DISCHARGED DEBT AFTER MY BANKRUPTCY CASE HAS BEEN CONCLUDED?

A debtor who has received a discharge may voluntarily repay any discharged debt. A debtor may repay a discharged debt even though it can no longer be legally enforced. Sometimes a debtor agrees to repay a debt because it is owed to a family member or because it represents an obligation to an individual for whom the debtor’s reputation is important, such as a family doctor. Visit DLBLAW for more information on Utah bankruptcy.

CAN I ELIMINATE ALL OF MY DEBT THROUGH BANKRUPTCY?

The simple answer is no. For the most part, credit card debt is generally subject to discharge, but in some instances it may not be. For example, credit that was issued based on fraudulent information by the debtor will not be discharged. Other debt, such as child support, spousal maintenance, and outstanding taxes will likewise not be discharged. The only way to know about your personal situation is to discuss your case with a bankruptcy attorney. In Utah you can find a consumer bankruptcy attorney on the web at www.utahchapter13.com .

CAN I RE-PAY A DISCHARGED DEBT AFTER MY BANKRUPTCY CASE IS OVER?

A debtor who has received a discharge may voluntarily repay any discharged debt. A debtor may repay a discharged debt even though it can no longer be legally enforced. Sometimes a debtor agrees to repay a debt because it is owed to a family member or because it represents an obligation to an individual for whom the debtor’s reputation is important, such as a family doctor. More information on bankruptcy can be founds at www.dlblaw.com

WHAT DISCLOSURES MUST A COLLECTION AGENCY PROVIDE A DEBTOR?

Typically, a collection agency begins its efforts with an introductory letter. This letter usually contains the required legal disclosures, which include:
• The amount of the debt,
• The name of the original creditor,
• The period of time in which the debtor may dispute the validity of the debt (thirty days), and
• The obligation of the collection agency to send the debtor verification of the debt if its validity is disputed.

In the original correspondence, the collection agency must also inform the debtor that it is attempting to collect a debt and that any information it gathers from the debtor or other sources will be used for that purpose. If this information is not included in the initial contact letter, the collection agency must provide it within five days.

Most lawyers recommend that debtors request verification of the debt because, in that case, a collection agency may not resume collection efforts until the information is confirmed with the original creditor. The collection agency may not, whether by threatening to destroy the debtor’s credit rating or by threatening to sue if payment is not received immediately, make a statement in the initial correspondence that overshadows the debtor’s right to dispute the debt for thirty days. Visit our website www.dlblaw.com